Books

Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics
124 Mt. Auburn Street
Suite 520N
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To reach Danielle Allen, please contact her assistant, Emily Bromley:

Email: emily@ethics.harvard.edu
Telephone: 617-496-3987
Fax: 617-496-6104
Web: www.ethics.harvard.edu

If you have an urgent query that pertains to the Institute for Advanced Study, please direct it to Ms Laura McCune at lmccune@ias.edu and 609-734-8216.

Our Declaration: A Reading of the Declaration of Independence in Defense of Equality (Norton/Liveright, 2014). 320 pages.

 

Education, Justice, and Democracy (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2013). 368 pages.

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(Co-edited with R. Reich). Education is a contested topic, and not just politically. For years scholars have approached it from two different points of view: one empirical, focused on explanations for student and school success and failure, and the other philosophical, focused on education’s value and purpose within the larger society. Rarely have these separate approaches been brought into the same conversation. Education, Justice, and Democracy does just that, offering an intensive discussion by highly respected scholars across empirical and philosophical disciplines.

 

Why Plato Wrote (Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010). 248 pages.

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Why Plato Wrote argues that Plato was not only the world’s first systematic political philosopher, but also the western world’s first think-tank activist and message man. In it, Allen shows that Plato wrote to change Athenian society and thereby transform Athenian politics as she offers accessible discussions of Plato’s philosophy of language and political theory.

 

Talking to Strangers: Anxieties of Citizenship since Brown vs. the Board of Education, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2004).  254 pages.

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"Don't talk to strangers" is the advice long given to children by parents of all classes and races. Today it has blossomed into a fundamental precept of civic education, reflecting interracial distrust, personal and political alienation, and a profound suspicion of others. In this powerful and eloquent essay, Danielle Allen, a 2002 MacArthur Fellow, takes this maxim back to Little Rock, rooting out the seeds of distrust to replace them with "a citizenship of political friendship."

Returning to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision of 1954 and to the famous photograph of Elizabeth Eckford, one of the Little Rock Nine, being cursed by fellow "citizen" Hazel Bryan, Allen argues that we have yet to complete the transition to political friendship that this moment offered. By combining brief readings of philosophers and political theorists with personal reflections on race politics in Chicago, Allen proposes strikingly practical techniques of citizenship. These tools of political friendship, Allen contends, can help us become more trustworthy to others and overcome the fossilized distrust among us.

Sacrifice is the key concept that bridges citizenship and trust, according to Allen. She uncovers the ordinary, daily sacrifices citizens make to keep democracy working—and offers methods for recognizing and reciprocating those sacrifices. Trenchant, incisive, and ultimately hopeful, Talking to Strangers is nothing less than a manifesto for a revitalized democratic citizenry.

 

The World of Prometheus: the Politics of Punishing in Democratic Athens, (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2000). 464 pages.

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For Danielle Allen, punishment is more a window onto democratic Athens' fundamental values than simply a set of official practices. From imprisonment to stoning to refusal of burial, instances of punishment in ancient Athens fueled conversations among ordinary citizens and political and literary figures about the nature of justice. Re-creating in vivid detail the cultural context of this conversation, Allen shows that punishment gave the community an opportunity to establish a shining myth of harmony and cleanliness: that the city could be purified of anger and social struggle, and perfect order achieved. Each member of the city--including notably women and slaves--had a specific role to play in restoring equilibrium among punisher, punished, and society. The common view is that democratic legal processes moved away from the "emotional and personal" to the "rational and civic," but Allen shows that anger, honor, reciprocity, spectacle, and social memory constantly prevailed in Athenian law and politics.

Drawing upon oratory, tragedy, and philosophy, Allen presents the lively intellectual climate in which punishment was incurred, debated, and inflicted by Athenians. Broad in scope, this book is one of the first to offer both a full account of punishment in antiquity and an examination of the political stakes of democratic punishment. It will engage classicists, political theorists, legal historians, and anyone wishing to learn more about the relations between institutions and culture, normative ideas and daily events, punishment and democracy.